Wednesday, July 8, 2009

My Ptooey Font

I'm still inking the Ptooey hiccup story. To make it a little easier, I made a font at YourFonts.com. They have a pretty nifty thing going: You print out a template, fill it in with hand-written letters, scan it, and upload it back to them. In a matter of moments, it automatically turns it into a handwriting font, for $14.95. Cool!

I'm sure it's not the greatest quality, because you get what you pay for. I don't think this would hold up to enlarging it over about a half an inch high. But since it's almost always going to be pretty small, for use in comic dialogue bubbles, that's okay with me. Here it is:


If anybody wants to use this in their own Ptooey & Loogie comics, email me, and I'll send you the font. Of course you could also use your own favorite font, or hand letter them. Ptooey is totally up to interpretation by the individual artist.

(Ptooey & Loogie were invented for the use of all Salty 'Ham Cartooneestas. Maybe if we collectively do enough stuff with them, we could set up a web-comic or self-publish something.)

past Ptooey links:
Invention of Ptooey & Loogie
The Secret Sorcerer comic jam, starring Ptooey & Loogie
4 more Ptooey strips by Garrison
Halloween Ptooey strip by Garrison
The Mommy of All Hiccups, early pencil draft

4 comments:

TimR said...

That looks really good.

I would think that for 14.95 you should be able to get the actual software though and make as many fonts as you want. Especially for a basic no-frills program.

The kerning looks good, did you have to adjust that or does it spit them out like that?

Can't wait to see the finished comic!

Chris_Garrison said...

> I would think that for 14.95 you should be able to get the actual software though and make as many fonts as you want.

I believe there are free font-making programs to be had, but they look to me like something I'd have to LEARN and then DO. Ugh! With this, there was nothing to do except draw the letters. I want to stay busy on designing characters and crafting stories and jokes, not learning software. But at some point, if I want to create a bunch more fonts, I might need to learn how to really do it. Or hire somebody that knows.

> The kerning looks good, did you have to adjust that or does it spit them out like that?

Is the kerning the horizontal-close-togetherness of the letters? Because I did have to adjust that, to make it look better.

TimR said...

yes, kerning is horizontal spacing. I think some fonts may have pre-set kerning for certain letter combinations---- though I'm not sure what software would recognize that, if that's at play in Microsoft Word or where exactly.

I take your point about learning software.

ratigan said...

It still looks awesome at this size & resolution. Good work!